Hours and Location

4922 Lakeshore Drive
PO Box 389
Bolton Landing, NY 12814-0389
Phone: (518) 644-2233     Fax: (518)644-2234
Email the Director

Off-Season Hours
Labor Day through Mid-June

Monday Closed
Tuesday 10am to 6pm
Wednesday10am to 6pm
Thursday 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.
Friday 10am to 6pm
Saturday 10am to 4pm
Sunday Closed

Summer Hours
From Mid-June through Labor Day

Monday 10am to 8pm
Tuesday 10am to 8pm
Wednesday 10am to 8pm
Thursday 10am to 8pm
Friday 10am to 8pm
Saturday 10am to 4pm
Sunday Closed

Lots going on at the Bolton Free Library in the next few months…
  • Trivia Monday continues on September 9th, 23rd and October 7th, and 21st.
  • Our Book Club meets on Tuesday, September 17th to discuss Carnegie’s Maid by Marie Benedict
  • Voter Registration Drive on Tuesday, September 24th from 4 to 7pm
  • Mah Jong, Anyone? Sue Heusner and Judy Killeen will offer free Mah Jong lessons on Wednesdays – September 18, 25, and October 2 at 1pm. Beginners and lapsed players welcome.
  • Screening of the new independent documentary about Front Porch Forum”The Story of Vermont’s Quiet Digital Revolution” Wednesday, October 9th at 7pm – Helping Neighbors Connect, Front Porch Forum is a free community-building service in Vermont and parts of New York. Your neighborhood’s forum is only open to the people who live there. It’s all about helping neighbors connect.
  • Whatever Happened to My White Picket Fence – how do you rewrite your life’s script after you have suffered a massive brain tumor? Janet Johnson Schliff was an award-winning special education teacher for 25 years. But as her abilities began to fade away with no medical explanation, she suffered from OCD behaviors to wreaked havoc on her much-loved career…a massive brain tumor was discovered, and finally after brain surgery, the odd behaviors it caused that had ruled her life for years were gone, only to be replaced by a different set of life-long challenges due to her injured brain. Janet will be here to discuss her book and her life on Tuesday, October 15th at 7pm.

Library Book Club

Here are the books we will be reading for the next few months:

  • Carnegie’s Maid by Marie Benedict – Serving as a lady’s maid in the household of Andrew Carnegie requires skills she doesn’t have, answering to an icy mistress who rules her sons and her domain with an iron fist. What Clara does have is a resolve as strong as the steel Pittsburgh is becoming famous for, coupled with an uncanny understanding of business, and Andrew begins to rely on her. Revealing her past might ruin her future — and her family’s. With captivating insight and heart, Carnegie’s Maid tells the story of one brilliant woman who may have spurred Andrew Carnegie’s transformation from ruthless industrialist into the world’s first true philanthropist.
  • The Story of Arthur Truluv by Elizabeth Berg – For the past six months, Arthur Moses’s days have looked the same: He tends to his rose garden and to Gordon, his cat, then rides the bus to the cemetery to visit his beloved late wife for lunch. Moved by Arthur’s kindness and devotion, Maddy gives him the nickname “Truluv.” As Arthur’s neighbor Lucille moves into their orbit, the unlikely trio band together and, through heartache and hardships, help one another rediscover their own potential to start anew. Wonderfully written and full of profound observations about life, The Story of Arthur Truluv is a beautiful and moving novel of compassion in the face of loss, of the small acts that turn friends into family, and of the possibilities to achieve happiness at any age.
  • Killers of the Flower Moon by David Grann – In the 1920s, the richest people per capita in the world were members of the Osage Indian nation in Oklahoma. After oil was discovered beneath their land, they rode in chauffeured automobiles, built mansions, and sent their children to study in Europe. Then, one by one, the Osage began to be killed off. And it was just the beginning, as more and more members of the tribe began to die under mysterious circumstances. In this last remnant of the Wild West—where oilmen like J. Getty made their fortunes and where desperadoes like Al Spencer, the “Phantom Terror,” roamed—many of those who dared to investigate the killings were themselves murdered. Together with the Osage, they began to expose one of the most chilling conspiracies in American history. In Killers of the Flower Moon, David Grann revisits a shocking series of crimes in which dozens of people were murdered in cold blood. But more than that, it is a searing indictment of the callousness and prejudice toward American Indians that allowed the murderers to operate with impunity for so long. Killers of the Flower Moon is utterly compelling, but also emotionally devastating.
  • Winter Sisters by Robin Oliveira – New York, 1879: An epic blizzard descends on Albany, devastating the city. When the snow finally settles, two newly orphaned girls are missing. Determined not to give up hope, Dr. Mary Sutter, a former Civil War surgeon, searches for the two sisters. When what happened to them is finally revealed, Dr. Sutter must fight the most powerful of Albany’s citizens, risking personal and public danger as she seeks to protect the fragile, putting at risk loves and lives in her quest to right unimaginable wrongs. As contemporary as it is historic, Winter Sisters is part gripping thriller, part family saga, and ultimately a story of trauma and resilience that explores the tremendous good and unspeakable evil of which humans are capable.